NEW PURCHASES

newpurchaseswhite1

When it comes to books, I have to admit that I am more of a buyer, as I tend to buy books and collect them in between my tiny room in London and my not so tiny room in Spain, and I feel quite proud of my little collection, although it does not make a difference if you like to spend money on books or you prefer to read for free in the library, the list of books to read is never ending, and so I guess I will have to rent a bigger room eventually.

Anyways, and regardless my lack of space, these are my picks of the month (only three, I’m taking it easy, I still have books that I bought last month and haven’t had a chance to read yet):

  1. The Vegetarian, by Han Kang

Excited about this one, I read the first page before buying it and I was already loving it. It is the story of Yeong-hye and her husband, and how their life changes when Yeong-hye starts seeking for a more ‘plant-like’ existence. Definitely doing a review after I finish it.

  1. How To Be Alone, by Jonathan Franzen

I know we can always expect something good from Franzen, as he does not publish anything he is not really happy about, but I have not heard about this one before, although it is supposed to be a collection of essays with critic tones, and I am a sucker for those.

  1. Hangover Square, by Patrick Hamilton

This was a random pick, I was basically attracted by the title and I did not even check what it was about when I bought it. It is set in London 1939, and it is supposed to be one of those convoluted stories you get yourself trapped in, so it seems worth reading.

Also, as you may have noticed walking down the streets after Halloween, it is Christmas season!  Which means Santa is coming with new books in his sack, and I think the 2016 list is going to be long…

Book review: Imperial Bedrooms, by Bret Easton Ellis

images  I am sure you all have watched American Psycho, and Bret Easton Ellis is the person we should all thank for such a master piece. Written with same satiric tones, Imperial Bedrooms will also play with your mind. Set in Hollywood, Clay is a current script writer who moves from New York to LA for the production of his new movie, and here is where everything gets complicated.

It is supposed to be a sort-of-continuation for Less Than Zero, although I skipped this prequel and went straight to the older Clay, but after reading Imperial Bedrooms I truly believe reading the first part would have helped me understand the character a bit better, which is not something easy to figure out through such an eccentric first person narrator.

From the beginning you can already tell it is going to be an intense story. Money, sex, drugs, you have all of those in this fiction, and it could not be any other way. The eccentricity of the work gives the plot and the character a tint of lunacy that will make you doubt throughout the whole thing.

The representation of the Hollywood society is what I loved the most. Bret Easton Ellis is a master in the art of “not saying anything but saying everything at the same time”. The background is explained by the actions of the characters themselves. Furthermore, the lack of punctuation marks and the overuse of the conjunction “and” will get you into the paranoiac of the situation, and the amok of the narrator’s mind.

“The movie was very different from the book in that there was nothing from the book in the movie.”

“She could be twenty. She could be thirty. You can’t tell. And if you could, everything would be over.”

If I had to choose one word to describe this work it would be chaos. If you can get easily offended and you dislike works with abundance of strange encounters and people that seem to be crazy, then you might want to skip this one, but I must say it is a sterling representation of the ostentatious life of Hollywood and the consequences of the greed for fame, and I do not regret reading it.